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Orthodontic Treatment for Adults: Considerations and Options

Orthodontic Treatment for Adults: Considerations and Options

Introduction 

Orthodontic treatment is often associated with teenagers, but it’s important to note that adults can benefit from orthodontic interventions as well. An increasing number of adults are seeking orthodontic treatment to improve their smiles and correct dental issues. This blog will explore the various considerations and options available when it comes to orthodontic treatment for adults, addressing common concerns and shedding light on the benefits of seeking orthodontic care later in life.

The Importance of Adult Orthodontic Treatment 

Adults may have various reasons for seeking orthodontic treatment, including aesthetic concerns, oral health improvements, and functional benefits. Orthodontic treatment can correct misaligned teeth, close gaps, and address bite issues that may lead to problems such as jaw pain, difficulty chewing, and speech impairments. Additionally, a straighter smile can boost confidence and improve overall well-being.

Types of Orthodontic Treatments for Adults 

Adults have several treatment options to choose from, depending on their specific needs and preferences. Traditional braces, consisting of metal brackets and wires, are still effective and widely used. However, many adults prefer more discreet options such as ceramic braces, which blend with the natural tooth color, or clear aligners like Invisalign, which are virtually invisible and removable.

 

Ceramic braces offer a less noticeable alternative to traditional braces, making them an attractive option for adults who want to minimize the appearance of braces. These braces are made of tooth-colored ceramic material, making them blend in with the natural color of the teeth.

 

Clear aligners, such as Invisalign, have gained popularity among adults due to their virtually invisible appearance and removability. Invisalign treatment involves a series of custom-made clear aligners that gradually move the teeth into the desired position. They can be removed for eating, brushing, and flossing, offering convenience and flexibility during treatment.

Considerations for Adult Orthodontic Treatment 

Before embarking on orthodontic treatment, adults should consider various factors. The first consideration is overall oral health. It is important to address any existing dental issues, such as gum disease or tooth decay, before starting orthodontic treatment. This ensures a healthy foundation for successful orthodontic treatment.

 

Additionally, adults should discuss their expectations and treatment goals with their orthodontist to ensure realistic outcomes. The orthodontist will evaluate the current state of their teeth and jaws and provide a treatment plan tailored to their specific needs.

 

Another consideration is the duration of treatment. Adult orthodontic treatment may take longer compared to treatment in adolescents due to the maturity of the jawbone. The length of treatment varies depending on the complexity of the case, but adults should be prepared for a commitment of several months to a few years. Patience and consistency are key to achieving the desired results.

 

Financial considerations are also crucial. Adult orthodontic treatment can be an investment, but many orthodontists offer flexible payment plans or accept insurance coverage. It’s important to discuss the cost and payment options with the orthodontist before starting treatment to ensure it fits within the individual’s budget.

Benefits and Challenges of Adult Orthodontic Treatment 

Adults can also benefit greatly from seeking orthodontic care. Whether it’s for aesthetic purposes or to address functional issues, adult orthodontic treatment offers numerous advantages. Here we will explore the benefits of orthodontic treatment for adults, highlighting the positive impact it can have on oral health, overall well-being, and self-confidence.

Improved Oral Health 

One of the primary benefits of adult orthodontic treatment is improved oral health. Misaligned teeth can make oral hygiene practices challenging, as they create hard-to-reach areas where plaque and bacteria can accumulate. By straightening the teeth, orthodontic treatment makes it easier to brush and floss effectively, reducing the risk of cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issues. Additionally, correcting bite problems can alleviate excessive wear on teeth, jaw pain, and discomfort, promoting long-term oral health.

Enhanced Functionality 

Orthodontic treatment for adults can improve the functionality of the mouth and jaw. Misaligned teeth or bite issues can lead to difficulties in chewing, speaking, and even breathing in some cases. By aligning the teeth and correcting the bite, orthodontic treatment can alleviate these functional problems, allowing for proper chewing and clearer speech. It can also help in reducing the strain on the jaw joints, which can alleviate discomfort and prevent the development of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD).

Aesthetics and Self-Confidence 

A straight and attractive smile can significantly boost an individual’s self-confidence. Many adults may have felt self-conscious about their crooked or misaligned teeth for years. Orthodontic treatment offers the opportunity to achieve a beautiful smile, which can have a positive impact on social interactions, personal relationships, and overall self-esteem. Feeling confident about one’s smile can lead to a more positive self-image and a willingness to engage in social and professional situations without hesitation.

Long-Term Cost Savings 

Addressing orthodontic issues in adulthood can potentially save individuals from more extensive and costly dental treatments down the line. Misaligned teeth can lead to dental problems such as tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss. By undergoing orthodontic treatment, adults can correct these issues before they worsen, potentially avoiding the need for more invasive and expensive dental procedures in the future.

Increased Career Opportunities 

In some professions, having a well-aligned and attractive smile can be advantageous. Certain industries place a high value on appearance, and a confident smile can make a positive impression on employers, clients, and colleagues. By investing in orthodontic treatment, adults may increase their career prospects and professional opportunities.

 

While adult orthodontic treatment offers numerous benefits, it is essential to acknowledge that there can be challenges associated with undergoing orthodontic care later in life.

Compliance and Lifestyle Factors 

One of the main challenges for adults undergoing orthodontic treatment is maintaining compliance with the recommended treatment plan. Adults often have busy lifestyles and may find it challenging to consistently wear aligners or braces as instructed by their orthodontist. Compliance is crucial for successful treatment outcomes, and it requires dedication and commitment to follow the orthodontist’s instructions regarding wearing time and care.

 

Treatment Duration 

Adult orthodontic treatment may take longer compared to treatment in adolescents due to the maturity of the jawbone. Depending on the complexity of the case, adults should be prepared for a commitment of several months to a few years. The longer treatment duration can be challenging for adults who desire quicker results. It is essential to have realistic expectations and understand that orthodontic treatment requires time for the teeth to move gradually into their desired positions.

 

Additional Interventions 

Adults may have more complex orthodontic cases that require additional interventions beyond braces or aligners. For example, some adults may require extractions to create space for teeth to align correctly, or jaw surgery to correct skeletal discrepancies. These additional interventions can add complexity and length to the treatment process, requiring coordination with other dental specialists and potentially increasing the overall cost of treatment.

 

Oral Hygiene and Maintenance

Maintaining good oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment can be challenging for adults. Braces or aligners can create areas where food particles and plaque can accumulate, increasing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease. Adults need to be diligent in their oral hygiene routine, including brushing and flossing regularly and using additional tools such as interdental brushes or water flossers to clean hard-to-reach areas. It is crucial to follow the orthodontist’s instructions on oral hygiene practices to ensure optimal oral health throughout the treatment process.

 

Financial Considerations 

Orthodontic treatment can be a significant investment, and financial considerations can be a challenge for adults. Insurance coverage for orthodontic treatment may vary, and not all plans provide coverage for adult orthodontics. It is important to consult with the orthodontist and understand the full cost of treatment, including any additional interventions that may be required. Many orthodontists offer flexible payment plans to help manage the financial burden.

 

Overall, While adult orthodontic treatment offers numerous benefits, it is important to be aware of the challenges that may arise during the process. Maintaining compliance, dealing with longer treatment duration, the potential need for additional interventions, ensuring good oral hygiene, and managing the financial aspect are all challenges that adults may face. By understanding these challenges and working closely with their orthodontist, adults can overcome these obstacles and achieve successful orthodontic outcomes. Remember, the result of a healthier, more confident smile is worth the effort and commitment throughout the treatment journey.

Conclusion 

Orthodontic treatment is not limited to teenagers; adults can also benefit from the transformational effects of orthodontics. Considering the importance of oral health, the various treatment options available, and the potential benefits, adults should not hesitate to explore orthodontic treatment. By addressing concerns, setting realistic expectations, and choosing the right treatment option, adults can achieve a straighter smile, improved oral health, and enhanced self-confidence. Consultation with an experienced orthodontist is the first step toward embarking on a successful adult orthodontic journey. Remember, age is no barrier to achieving a beautiful and healthy smile.

Resources:

  1. https://aaoinfo.org/adult-orthodontics/
  2. https://smile2impress.com/us/blog/orthodontics-and-braces-for-adults
  3. https://www.newmouth.com/orthodontics/life-stages/adult-braces/
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The Future of Orthodontics: Merging Advanced Technology with Expert In-Person Care for Unmatched Results

The Future of Orthodontics: Merging Advanced Technology with Expert In-Person Care for Unmatched Results

The clear aligner industry has seen remarkable growth in recent years, revolutionizing orthodontic treatment and providing patients with a discreet, convenient, and aesthetically pleasing alternative to traditional braces. As an expert in the clear aligner market and the co-founder of Impress, I have been at the forefront of this transformation and have consistently emphasized the importance of expert in-person care to ensure optimal treatment outcomes.  

A work-of-art smile that combines improved health and function can only be achieved through the careful assessment and guidance of an expert doctor

  While remote monitoring and tele-orthodontics have opened new doors in the world of orthodontics, there remains a crucial need for in-person examinations and treatment by skilled doctors. A work-of-art smile that combines improved health and function can only be achieved through the careful assessment and guidance of an expert doctor who understands the nuances of each patient’s unique condition and can provide the medical interventions in person to augment the ability of clear aligners to correct bites and improve oral health.  

We know that teeth move like icebergs, what controls their movement lies beneath the surface.

  At Impress, we recognize the value of personalized care and have developed a comprehensive treatment approach that combines the benefits of advanced mobile technology with the expertise of our highly qualified doctors. Our patented 3D deep-root fusion technology enables us to customize treatments with unprecedented precision and predictability, ensuring that each patient receives an unparalleled treatment that reduces risks by automatically adjusting tooth movement. We know that teeth move like icebergs, what controls their movement lies beneath the surface. And yet, no other company incorporates this benefit as we do for each of our patients in the US. This makes our treatment comfortable, cost-effective, expedient; and unlike anywhere else on the planet.   By offering in-person treatment and leveraging our state-of-the-art technology, Impress safely addresses the three philosophical problems that have traditionally deterred individuals from pursuing orthodontic treatment:  
  1. Orthodontic treatment ought not to be so burdensome: Our expert doctors understand the importance of making the treatment process as comfortable and efficient as possible. By providing personalized care and utilizing cutting-edge technology, we minimize the burden of treatment, ensuring a smooth and hassle-free experience for our patients.
  2. Orthodontics ought not to be so unesthetic: Clear aligners offer a virtually invisible solution that allows patients to maintain their appearance and confidence throughout the treatment process. At Impress, our commitment to creating beautiful, healthy smiles extends beyond aesthetics. Our in-person care ensures that we address not only the appearance but also the underlying functional and health aspects of each patient’s smile.
  3. Orthodontics ought not to be so expensive: Our innovative technology and streamlined processes allow us to offer high-quality orthodontic care at an affordable price, making treatment more accessible to a wider range of patients. By prioritizing cost-effective solutions, we strive to break down financial barriers and make the dream of a perfect smile a reality for all.
In conclusion, the clear aligner industry has made great strides in revolutionizing orthodontic care, but the importance of expert in-person consultation and treatment should not be taken lightly. By combining the expertise of our skilled doctors with the latest technology, Impress is dedicated to delivering unparalleled patient care and crafting beautiful smiles that improve health, function, and aesthetics, while addressing the philosophical concerns that have long plagued the orthodontic industry.
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Transforming Orthodontics: A Deep Dive into Digital Bonding Systems

Transforming Orthodontics: A Deep Dive into Digital Bonding Systems

In an era dominated by technological advancements, the field of modern dentistry stands on the cusp of a significant transformation, driven by innovations in orthodontic technology. At the forefront of this revolution are digital bonding systems and software, reshaping the landscape of orthodontic treatments. In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the world of digital bonding, examining its definition, operational principles, and the pivotal role played by software. Additionally, we will highlight the key features of modern orthodontic software and the myriad advantages it brings to the table.  

Embracing Technological Advancements in Dentistry

  In the contemporary realm of dentistry, the integration of technological advancements is imperative. Digital bonding, often referred to as indirect bonding, emerges as a revolutionary technique in orthodontics, and this guide seeks to shed light on how it is redefining the dental landscape.  

Understanding Digital Bonding: A Technique Revolutionizing Orthodontics

  Digital bonding, or indirect bonding, involves temporarily attaching orthodontic brackets to dental models before transferring them into a patient’s mouth. This meticulous process utilizes a template transfer splint, ensuring not only precise bracket placement but also an enhanced level of comfort for the patient.  

The Technological Marvel: How Digital Bonding Works

  Digital bonding leverages cutting-edge technology to streamline the traditional bracket placement process, making it more efficient and accurate than manual placement. Incorporating 3D scanning, simulation, and computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, this method introduces various techniques, including direct bonding, indirect bonding, clear aligners, lingual braces, self-ligating brackets, temporary anchorage devices (TADs), orthodontic bands, and adhesive systems.  

The Role of Digital Bonding Systems

  Digital bonding systems, a crucial component of modern orthodontics, represent a paradigm shift in the attachment of orthodontic brackets. These systems utilize high-resolution intraoral scanners to capture detailed 3D images of a patient’s dentition, eliminating the need for traditional alginate impressions. Specialized software then plans the precise placement of orthodontic brackets, leading to the creation of custom transfer trays or templates. This innovative approach minimizes chair time, reduces the need for adjustments, and provides orthodontists with unparalleled control and predictability.  

The Significance of Software in Enabling Effective Digital Bonding

  Specialized software plays a pivotal role in the planning and visualization of orthodontic treatment. It allows orthodontists to simulate and visualize the entire treatment process on a computer screen, integrating dental software tools for optimal bracket placement and informed decision-making. This virtual treatment planning enhances accuracy, fosters effective communication with patients, and seamlessly integrates with other digital tools, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and Radiology Information System (RIS).  

Key Features of Modern Digital Bonding Software

  Digital bonding software introduces a new era in AI orthodontics, bringing forth innovative features such as digital impressions and 3D scanning. These advancements usher in a patient-centric approach, bidding farewell to conventional, cumbersome molds. The software’s key features include digital impressions and 3D scanning, virtual treatment planning, CAD/CAM technology integration, precise bracket positioning, custom orthodontic appliances, digital archiving, simulation and prediction tools, and seamless integration with other systems.  

Advantages of Embracing Digital Bonding Systems

  The adoption of digital bonding systems brings transformative advantages to the orthodontic experience. These encompass precision and accuracy, time efficiency, enhanced visualization, improved patient experience, streamlined workflow, and customization tailored to individual patient needs. The outcome is an orthodontic journey streamlined for swift, predictable results, instilling confidence and convenience in patients on their path to enhanced dental health.  

Conclusion: Redefining Orthodontics through Digital Innovation

  As we conclude this exploration of digital bonding systems and software, their transformative impact on orthodontics is vividly clear. Precision, efficiency, and heightened patient satisfaction stand as the cornerstones of this evolution. Embracing these technologies is not merely stepping into the future; it is a resolute pledge to uphold the highest standards of excellence in contemporary dentistry. By embracing these digital innovations, orthodontics isn’t just advancing; it’s being redefined. This revolution signifies not only progress but a commitment to shaping a future where every smile is a testament to the extraordinary potential of modern dental technology.  
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Digital Bonding Systems in Orthodontics: Embracing the Future of Dentistry

Digital Bonding Systems in Orthodontics: Embracing the Future of Dentistry

  In the ever-evolving landscape of modern dentistry, a significant revolution is underway, driven by innovations in orthodontic technology. At the forefront of this transformation are digital bonding systems and software, fundamentally altering the planning and execution of orthodontic treatments. In this comprehensive guide, we explore the realm of digital bonding, elucidating its definition, operational principles, and the pivotal role played by software. Additionally, we delve into the key features of contemporary orthodontic software and the multitude of advantages it brings to the orthodontic table.  

What is Digital Bonding?

  Digital bonding, also known as indirect bonding, is an orthodontic technique that involves temporarily affixing orthodontic brackets to dental models before transferring them into a patient’s mouth. This precise process utilizes a template transfer splint, ensuring accurate bracket placement and heightened patient comfort.  

How Digital Bonding Works

  Digital bonding relies on cutting-edge technology to streamline the traditional bracket placement process, employing 3D scanning, simulation, and computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. This approach contrasts with manual placement and includes methods such as direct bonding, indirect bonding, clear aligners, lingual braces, self-ligating brackets, temporary anchorage devices (TADs), orthodontic bands, and adhesive systems.  

What Are Digital Bonding Systems?

  Digital bonding systems represent a pivotal component of contemporary orthodontics, incorporating advanced tools and technologies to revolutionize the attachment of orthodontic brackets. These systems use high-resolution intraoral scanners to capture detailed 3D images, eliminating the need for traditional alginate impressions. Specialized software then plans precise bracket placement, and custom transfer trays ensure accurate bonding, minimizing chair time and reducing the need for adjustments.  

The Importance of Software in Enabling Effective Digital Bonding

  Specialized software plays a crucial role in planning and visualizing orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists can simulate and visualize the entire treatment process, design optimal bracket placement, and make informed decisions. This virtual treatment planning enhances accuracy, fosters effective communication with patients, and seamlessly integrates with other digital tools, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and Radiology Information System (RIS).  

Key Features of Modern Digital Bonding Software

  Modern digital bonding software introduces innovative features, including digital impressions, 3D scanning, virtual treatment planning, CAD/CAM technology integration, precise bracket positioning, custom orthodontic appliances, digital archiving, simulation and prediction tools, and integration with other systems. These advancements signify a patient-centric approach, replacing conventional molds with cutting-edge technology.  

Advantages of Digital Bonding Systems

  Adopting digital bonding systems offers transformative advantages, including precision and accuracy in bracket placement, time efficiency, enhanced visualization, improved patient experience, streamlined workflow, and customization tailored to individual patient needs. This results in predictable treatment outcomes, shorter overall treatment durations, and a stress-free orthodontic journey.  

Conclusion

  As we conclude our exploration of digital bonding systems and software, their transformative impact on orthodontics is unmistakable. Precision, efficiency, and heightened patient satisfaction stand as the pillars of this evolution. Embracing these technologies is not merely a step into the future; it is a commitment to excellence in contemporary dentistry. By advancing orthodontics, we redefine it, pledging to shape a future where every smile reflects the extraordinary potential of modern dental technology. This revolution is more than progress; it is a dedication to crafting a future where precision, speed, and exceptional care define every patient’s orthodontic experience.
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The Importance of Retention after Orthodontic Treatment

The Importance of Retention after Orthodontic Treatment

Keeping Your New Smile in Place

Introduction

Orthodontic treatment is a significant investment, both in terms of time and money. After months or even years of wearing braces or aligners, it’s essential to understand the importance of retention in maintaining the results achieved. This blog will explore why retention is crucial after orthodontic treatment and how it helps keep your new smile in place.

Section 1: Understanding the Process of Orthodontic Treatment

Before discussing the importance of retention, it is crucial to understand the process of orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment involves utilizing braces, aligners, or other appliances to correct misaligned teeth, jaw discrepancies, and bite issues. This process gradually moves the teeth into their proper positions, aligning the bite and creating a harmonious smile.

Section 2: What is Retention?

After the active phase of orthodontic treatment, the retention phase begins. Retention involves using retainers to hold the teeth in their new positions. Retainers are custom-made devices that help prevent the teeth from shifting back to their original, misaligned positions. They can be removable or fixed, depending on the individual’s needs and the orthodontist’s recommendation.

Section 3: types of retainers

There are different types of retainers available to help maintain the results achieved through orthodontic treatment. The choice of retainer depends on various factors, including the individual’s needs, treatment outcome, and the orthodontist’s recommendation. Let’s explore some of the common types of retainers:
  • Removable Retainers:

These are the most commonly used retainers and are usually made of acrylic and wire. They can be easily taken out for eating, brushing, and flossing. Removable retainers are custom-made to fit your teeth and provide gentle pressure to keep them in their new positions. They are convenient and allow for easy maintenance.
  • Clear Aligner-Style Retainers:

These retainers resemble clear aligners and are made of a transparent plastic material. They are custom-made to fit snugly over your teeth, providing subtle retention. Clear aligner-style retainers are removable and virtually invisible, making them a popular choice, especially for individuals who have undergone treatment with clear aligners.
  • Fixed Retainers:

Also known as bonded or permanent retainers, these are thin wires that are attached to the back of the teeth using dental adhesive. Fixed retainers are not removable and provide continuous retention. They are particularly useful for preventing relapse in the lower front teeth, which are prone to shifting.
  • Combination Retainers:

In some cases, orthodontists may recommend a combination of removable and fixed retainers to achieve optimal results. This approach allows for both the convenience of removable retainers and the continuous retention provided by fixed retainers. It is important to follow your orthodontist’s instructions regarding retainer wear, cleaning, and maintenance. Regular check-ups with your orthodontist will ensure that your retainer is functioning effectively and that your smile remains stable over time. Here are some points about the importance of retainers.

Section 4: The Importance of Retention

4.1 Stabilizing the Teeth:

Stabilizing the teeth is a crucial aspect of retention after orthodontic treatment. While braces or aligners effectively move the teeth into their desired positions, the surrounding bone and tissues need time to adapt and stabilize. Without proper retention, the teeth may gradually shift back to their original misaligned positions, undoing the progress made during treatment. Retainers provide a constant, gentle force that helps to counteract this natural tendency, keeping the teeth in their new, corrected positions. By wearing retainers as prescribed by the orthodontist, patients can ensure that their teeth remain stable, preventing any unwanted shifting or relapse. Stabilizing the teeth through retention is vital for maintaining the long-term success of orthodontic treatment and enjoying a beautiful, straight smile for years to come.

4.2 Preventing Relapse:

Preventing relapse is another significant reason why retention is crucial after orthodontic treatment. Relapse refers to the shifting of teeth back to their original misaligned positions, and it can occur for several reasons. Natural growth and aging can cause changes in the jaw and facial structure, which may lead to the teeth shifting over time. Additionally, inadequate retention, such as not wearing retainers as prescribed, can also contribute to relapse. Wearing retainers as recommended by your orthodontist helps to minimize the risk of relapse. Retainers provide a constant, gentle force that helps to maintain the teeth in their new positions, preventing them from reverting to their previous alignment. By consistently wearing retainers, patients can preserve the results achieved through orthodontic treatment and enjoy a long-lasting, straight smile. It is important to note that retention is a lifelong commitment. As time passes, the frequency of retainer wear may decrease, but periodic use is essential to prevent any potential relapse. Regular check-ups with your orthodontist will ensure that your teeth remain stable, and any necessary adjustments to the retention plan can be made if needed. By prioritizing retention and following your orthodontist’s recommendations, you can significantly reduce the risk of relapse and maintain the beautiful, straight smile you worked hard to achieve. Remember, retention is key to long-term success in orthodontic treatment.

4.3 Allowing Tissues to Adapt:

Retention not only stabilizes the teeth but also allows the surrounding tissues to adapt to the new tooth positions. During orthodontic treatment, the gums and bones undergo remodeling to accommodate the movement of the teeth. This remodeling process takes time, and retention helps in allowing the tissues to adapt fully. By wearing retainers as prescribed, the surrounding tissues have the opportunity to settle and stabilize around the new positions of the teeth. This allows for a more harmonious and stable alignment, reducing the chances of relapse. The retention phase also helps to ensure that the teeth and surrounding tissues are in balance, promoting optimal oral health. Without proper retention, the tissues may not have enough time to adapt fully, which can lead to instability and potential relapse. By consistently wearing retainers, patients allow their tissues to adjust and settle into their new positions, enhancing the long-term stability of their smile. In summary, retention plays a vital role in allowing the surrounding tissues to adapt and stabilize around the new tooth positions. By wearing retainers as prescribed, patients can ensure that their new smile remains stable and aligned, contributing to the long-term success of their orthodontic treatment.

Section 5: Types of Retainers

There are various types of retainers available, each with its advantages and considerations. The choice of retainer depends on factors such as the individual’s needs, treatment outcome, and the orthodontist’s recommendation. Removable retainers, made of acrylic and wire, are the most commonly used retainers. They can be easily taken out for eating, brushing, and flossing, providing convenience and easy maintenance. Clear aligner-style retainers resemble clear aligners and are made of transparent plastic material. They are custom-made to fit snugly over the teeth, providing subtle retention. These retainers are removable and virtually invisible, making them a popular choice, especially for individuals who have undergone treatment with clear aligners. Fixed retainers, also known as bonded or permanent retainers, consist of thin wires that are attached to the back of the teeth using dental adhesive. Fixed retainers are not removable and provide continuous retention. They are particularly useful for preventing relapse in the lower front teeth, which are prone to shifting. It is crucial to follow the orthodontist’s instructions regarding retainer wear, cleaning, and maintenance. Regular check-ups with the orthodontist will ensure that the retainer is functioning effectively and that the smile remains stable over time. By understanding the different types of retainers and following the orthodontist’s guidance, individuals can choose the most suitable retainer and maintain the results achieved from their orthodontic treatment.

Conclusion

Retention is indeed a critical component of orthodontic treatment, as it helps to prevent relapse and maintain the results achieved. Wearing retainers as directed by the orthodontist is essential for long-term success. It is important to recognize that the commitment to retention is just as important as the commitment to the active phase of treatment. By consistently wearing retainers, patients can ensure that their teeth remain stable and in their newly corrected positions. This commitment to retention is an investment in a beautiful smile that will last a lifetime. It is crucial to follow the orthodontist’s instructions regarding the wear, care, and maintenance of retainers to ensure their effectiveness. So, embrace the importance of retention and the benefits it brings. By doing so, you can enjoy the confidence and satisfaction that come with maintaining a well-aligned, straight smile for years to come. Remember, your commitment to retention is key to preserving the results of your orthodontic treatment and enjoying the lasting benefits of a beautiful smile.
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Orthodontic Expansion

Orthodontic Expansion

Techniques to widen the upper or lower jaw to correct cross bites or crowding

A beautiful smile is not just about straight teeth, but also about proper alignment and balance between the upper and lower jaws. Many people suffer from dental issues such as crossbites or crowding, which can affect their oral health and overall appearance. Fortunately, orthodontic expansion techniques are available to address these problems by widening the upper or lower jaw. In this blog post, we will explore the various techniques used for orthodontic expansion and how they can help correct crossbites or crowding.

What is Orthodontic Expansion?

Orthodontic expansion, also known as palatal expansion or maxillary expansion, is a technique that involves widening the upper jaw (maxilla) or the lower jaw (mandible). It is primarily used to address dental issues caused by a narrow jaw, such as crossbites or crowding. By expanding the jaw, more space is created for the teeth to align properly, improving both aesthetics and function.

Crossbites and Crowding: The Need for Orthodontic Expansion

Crossbites occur when the upper teeth bite inside the lower teeth instead of outside, causing an improper alignment of the dental arches. This can lead to functional problems like difficulty chewing or speaking, as well as aesthetic concerns. Crowding, on the other hand, happens when there isn’t enough space in the jaw for all the teeth to fit properly. This can result in crooked or overlapping teeth, making cleaning difficult and increasing the risk of dental issues like tooth decay and gum disease. Orthodontic expansion is an effective treatment option for crossbites and crowding because it addresses the underlying skeletal problem of a narrow jaw. By widening the jaw, more room is created for the teeth to move into their correct positions, improving both the bite and the overall alignment of the teeth.

Techniques for Orthodontic Expansion

 There are several techniques available for orthodontic expansion, and the choice of technique depends on various factors such as the patient’s age, the severity of the dental issue, and the desired treatment outcome. Here are some commonly used techniques:
  • Rapid Palatal Expansion (RPE): This is one of the most popular techniques for maxillary expansion. It involves the use of a custom-made appliance called a palatal expander, which is typically fixed to the posterior teeth in the upper jaw. The expander applies gentle pressure on the palate, gradually widening the upper jaw.
While RPE can be highly effective, there are some drawbacks associated with the procedure. Here are a few drawbacks and potential solutions:
  • Discomfort and Pain: RPE involves applying gradual pressure to expand the upper jaw, which can cause discomfort or pain for some patients. This is especially true during the initial adjustment period when the device is activated.
Solution: To alleviate discomfort, orthodontists may recommend over-the-counter pain relievers or prescribe mild analgesics if necessary. Applying ice packs to the affected area may also help reduce swelling and relieve pain. It’s essential for patients to follow their orthodontist’s instructions regarding pain management and report any severe or persistent pain.
  • Speech Difficulties: RPE can temporarily affect speech, particularly during the initial phase of adjustment. Patients may experience lisping or difficulty pronouncing certain sounds due to the changes in the position of the palate.
Solution: Speech difficulties caused by RPE usually resolve spontaneously over time as the patient adapts to the expanded palate. However, it can be beneficial to work with a speech therapist who can provide exercises and techniques to help improve speech clarity during the adjustment period.
  • Oral Hygiene Challenges: The presence of RPE appliances can make it more challenging to maintain good oral hygiene. The device itself can trap food particles and increase the risk of plaque accumulation, leading to tooth decay and gum disease if proper care is not taken.
Solution: It is crucial for patients to follow a diligent oral hygiene routine that includes brushing after every meal and flossing daily. Additionally, using an antimicrobial mouthwash recommended by the orthodontist can help control bacteria. Regular dental check-ups and professional cleanings are also essential to monitor oral health and address any issues promptly.
  • Risk of Relapse: In some cases, there is a potential for relapse after the RPE appliance is removed. The jaw may gradually shift back to its original position if proper retention measures are not taken.
Solution: To prevent relapse, orthodontists typically prescribe a retainer to be worn after the removal of the RPE appliance. Retainers help maintain the corrected position of the jaw by providing stability and preventing any unwanted movement. Patients must strictly follow their orthodontist’s instructions regarding retainer wear to ensure long-term stability. It’s Important to note that the drawbacks mentioned above are generally temporary and manageable with proper care and guidance from an orthodontic professional. Each patient’s experience may vary, and it is crucial to communicate any concerns or issues with your orthodontist to ensure the best possible outcome.

Drawbacks of Slow Palatal Expansion:

  1. Slow Palatal Expansion: In cases where rapid expansion is not recommended or suitable, slow palatal expansion can be used. This technique involves the use of a removable appliance that the patient wears for an extended period. The appliance exerts a continuous, controlled force on the palate, gradually expanding the upper jaw over time.
  2. Prolonged Treatment Duration: Slow palatal expansion techniques typically require a longer treatment duration compared to rapid palatal expansion methods. The gradual nature of the expansion can lead to a slower rate of correction, which may extend the overall treatment time.
  3. Discomfort and Disruption: Patients undergoing slow palatal expansion may experience discomfort and disruption in their daily activities. The continuous pressure applied to the palate can cause soreness and difficulty in speaking, eating, and maintaining oral hygiene.
  4. Lack of Patient Compliance: Slow palatal expansion often involves the use of removable appliances that rely on patient compliance. Inconsistent or improper usage of these devices can impede the progress of the expansion process and result in suboptimal outcomes.
  5. Limited Skeletal Effects: Slow palatal expansion primarily targets dental effects rather than significant skeletal changes. This technique may not be as effective in cases where more substantial skeletal modifications are required to address specific orthodontic issues.

Potential Solutions for Slow Palatal Expansion:

  1. Improved Appliance Design: Developing innovative appliance designs can help enhance the effectiveness and comfort of slow palatal expansion. Advancements in materials and technology can lead to the creation of more efficient and patient-friendly devices.
  2. Enhanced Patient Education and Motivation: Educating patients about the importance of consistent appliance wear and providing motivation for compliance can improve the outcomes of slow palatal expansion. Clear instructions, regular follow-ups, and engaging communication can encourage patients to adhere to the treatment plan.
  3. Combined Treatment Approaches: Combining slow palatal expansion with other orthodontic techniques, such as orthopedic appliances or surgical interventions, may be necessary in cases requiring more significant skeletal modifications. A comprehensive treatment plan tailored to individual needs can optimize outcomes.
  4. Accelerated Techniques: Exploring accelerated palatal expansion techniques, such as vibration or low-level laser therapy, may help expedite the expansion process without compromising stability or patient comfort. These techniques aim to promote bone remodeling and accelerate tooth movement for faster results.
  5. Early Intervention: Identifying orthodontic issues that may benefit from palatal expansion at an early stage can potentially reduce treatment time. Early intervention allows for more favorable growth patterns and increased response to treatment, minimizing the drawbacks associated with a prolonged duration of therapy.
It’s Important to consult with an orthodontist or dental professional for a thorough assessment and personalized recommendations regarding slow palatal expansion and its potential drawbacks and solutions.
  1. Mandibular Expansion: While maxillary expansion is more common, mandibular expansion can also be performed when the lower jaw needs to be widened. This technique involves using special appliances or functional devices that stimulate the growth and expansion of the mandible.
  2. Miniscrew-assisted Rapid Palatal Expansion (MARPE): This is a relatively new technique that combines the principles of RPE with the use of miniscrews for anchorage. Miniscrews are temporarily inserted into the bone to provide stable support for the expander, allowing for more controlled and precise expansion.

Benefits and Considerations

Orthodontic expansion offers numerous benefits for patients with crossbites or crowding. Firstly, it improves the alignment of the teeth, resulting in a more harmonious smile. Secondly, it enhances the functionality of the bite, making chewing and speaking easier. Additionally, by creating more space in the jaw, orthodontic expansion can eliminate the need for tooth extraction in some cases, preserving natural teeth. However, it’s important to note that orthodontic expansion is not suitable for everyone. The success of the treatment depends on factors such as age, bone density, and the presence of underlying skeletal issues. Therefore, a thorough evaluation by an orthodontist is essential to determine whether orthodontic expansion is the right treatment option. In conclusion, orthodontic expansion techniques are valuable tools in correcting dental issues like crossbites or crowding. By widening the upper or lower jaw, these techniques create more space for the teeth to align properly, improving both aesthetics and functionality. If you have concerns about your bite or the alignment of your teeth, consult with an orthodontist who can evaluate your condition and recommend the most appropriate orthodontic expansion technique for you. Remember, a beautiful smile starts with a well-aligned jaw!  
Orthodontic treatment

Orthodontic treatment

Orthodontic treatment

Orthodontic treatment

What is orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontic treatment is a way of straightening or moving teeth, to improve the appearance of the teeth and how they work. It can also help to look after the long-term health of your teeth, gums and jaw joints, by spreading the biting pressure over all your teeth.

Why should I have orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontic treatment can be beneficial for a number of reasons. Some common reasons include:

Straightening crooked or crowded teeth, which can improve the appearance of your smile.

Correcting problems with your bite, which can prevent issues such as jaw pain or difficulty chewing.

Reducing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease by making it easier to properly clean your teeth.

Improving your overall oral health by addressing any structural issues in your mouth that may be causing problems.

Boosting your self-esteem and confidence by giving you a healthier and more attractive smile.

Of course, the specific benefits of orthodontic treatment will depend on your individual needs and goals. I recommend speaking with an orthodontist to learn more about how treatment could benefit you.

At what age should I have orthodontic treatment?

Early Treatment (Phase I)

Orthodontic treatment is one of the most common treatments we perform for children. Early orthodontic treatment is recommended when extensive treatment is needed. This is treatment that must be done prior to traditional braces and is used to solve problems that can’t be delayed.

  • What is early orthodontic treatment?

Early orthodontic remedy is generally finished on patients between the ages of 6 and 10. The aim of section 1 is to teach and expand a child’s jaws. This will make room for everlasting tooth and enhance the chew of higher and decrease jaws. Throughout remedy, your child’s mouth adjustments form and has advanced alignment, chew, and spacing. All of this results in higher oral fitness withinside the lengthy run, as properly as elevated vanity on your child.

Treatment normally takes among nine and 18 months. The duration of remedy will rely closely at the circumstance of a child’s mouth and what is wanted to create an most advantageous surroundings for his or her person tooth to develop into. This remedy ought to be performed earlier than everlasting tooth begin to make an appearance. The earlier, the better.

Phase 1 is used to deal with a huge type of orthodontic issues. It can assist to enhance speech development, alternate the location of first molars, lower the opportunity of sticking out tooth being damaged, eliminating or lowering the want for extractions, and widening your palate.

  • Who carries out orthodontics?

Orthodontic treatment is typically carried out by a dentist or an orthodontist. An orthodontist is a dental specialist who has completed additional training and education in the field of orthodontics, which focuses on correcting misaligned teeth and jaws. However, some general dentists also offer orthodontic treatments such as braces and clear aligners.

  • What does it involve?

Orthodontic treatment involves the use of appliances to align and straighten teeth and correct bite problems. The most common orthodontic appliances are braces, which are made of metal brackets and wires that are attached to the teeth and adjusted over time to gradually shift them into the desired position.

Other orthodontic appliances include clear aligners, which are a series of custom-made plastic trays that fit over the teeth and gradually move them into place, as well as retainers, which are worn after braces or clear aligner treatment to keep the teeth in their new positions.

In addition to traditional braces and clear aligners, there are other orthodontic appliances that can be used to treat specific issues such as jaw misalignment and breathing problems during sleep. Your dentist or orthodontist will evaluate your specific needs and develop a treatment plan tailored to your individual situation

Will I need to have my teeth taken out to make room?

In some cases, it may be necessary to remove one or more teeth in order to create enough space for the remaining teeth to be properly aligned. This is typically done when there is severe crowding or other alignment issues that cannot be corrected without creating more space.

However, not all patients require tooth extraction as part of their orthodontic treatment. Your dentist or orthodontist will assess your individual situation and determine whether tooth extraction is necessary to achieve the desired results.

If it is determined that tooth extraction is necessary, your dentist or orthodontist will discuss the procedure with you in detail and provide guidance on how to prepare for the extraction and what to expect during and after the procedure.

How is treatment carried out?

There are several types of technological orthodontic treatments that are commonly carried out, including:

Traditional braces: Traditional braces use metal brackets and wires to gradually shift teeth into the correct position.

Ceramic braces: Similar to traditional braces, ceramic braces use clear or tooth-colored brackets and wires for a more discreet appearance.

Lingual braces: Lingual braces are placed on the backside of the teeth instead of the front, making them less visible.

Invisalign: Invisalign uses a series of clear plastic aligners that are custom-made to fit over the teeth and gradually shift them into place.

Self-ligating braces: Self-ligating braces use unique brackets that eliminate the need for elastic bands, allowing for smoother and quicker adjustments.

Accelerated orthodontics: This type of treatment involves using devices such as AcceleDent or Propel Orthodontics to speed up the rate at which teeth move into their correct positions.

Jaw surgery: In some cases, jaw surgery may be necessary to correct severe bite issues or misalignments that cannot be corrected with braces alone.

Orthodontic treatment can be done by many sorts of appliances, which most people call a ‘brace’.

What are the effects of smart technology on orthodenticle treatment?

Smart technology has had a significant impact on orthodontic treatment in recent years. With the rise of digital dentistry, orthodontic practices have become more efficient and effective than ever before.

One of the most notable advancements enabled by smart technology is the use of clear aligners, such as Invisalign. These aligners are custom-made for each patient using advanced 3D imaging software, which allows for more precise and accurate treatment planning. Additionally, patients can track their progress through virtual models that show how their teeth will move over time, providing a better understanding of the treatment process.

Other advances include the use of digital scanners to create accurate impressions of patients’ teeth without the need for messy, uncomfortable molds. This not only improves the patient experience, but also allows for faster turnaround times and better fitting appliances.

Overall, smart technology has revolutionized orthodontic treatment, making it more comfortable, efficient, and personalized than ever before.

What is a removable brace?

Simple remedy can be accomplished with a detachable brace (a plate that may be taken out to be cleaned). It has sensitive wires and springs attached, which pass the enamel the use of mild pressure.

What is a fixed brace?

Often, teeth want to be guided accurately than they may be the usage of a detachable brace. So a fixed brace is used. This has brackets and bands which can be briefly stick to the teeth. A bendy twine joins all the brackets and lets in the teeth to be moved. You cannot take the appliance out yourself, so its miles known as a fixed appliance.

What is a functional brace?

A function brace is an appliance that is used to correct the way a patient’s teeth and jaws come together when they bite down. Function braces are typically used to treat malocclusions (bad bites) that result from issues such as overbites, underbites, crossbites, and open bites.

A function brace usually consists of two parts: an upper part and a lower part. The upper part fits onto the palate or roof of the mouth, while the lower part fits onto the lower teeth. When the patient bites down, the function brace helps to guide the jaw into the correct position, allowing the teeth to come together properly.

Function braces are often used in combination with other orthodontic appliances, such as brackets, wires, and elastics, to achieve the desired results. Treatment with a function brace can take several months to a year or more, depending on the severity of the malocclusion and the specific needs of the patient

What are the brackets made of?

Fixed braces are not always made of metal. Plastic and ceramic can be used, especially for adults

What are ‘invisible braces’?

They are tough, invisible plastic ‘aligners’ (moulds) which can be used to straighten tooth. Several units of specially moulded, a bit special aligner is made for every patient. Each set is worn for 2 weeks earlier than getting changed with the subsequent one. They are crafted from clear plastic, so they’re almost invisible. This means that no person would understand you’re straightening your tooth.

What are elastics?

Sometimes delicate elastic bands are attached to a fixed brace to help move the teeth. Your orthodontist will tell you if you need elastics.

How do I care for my brace and teeth?

It is important to keep having your teeth checked by your dental team while you are having orthodontic treatment. You also need to take extra care of your teeth and mouth:

  • Clean your teeth carefully every day, including between your teeth where you can. Braces are delicate and you need to make sure you clean them carefully so that they do not break. Your dental team will be able to show you the special techniques to use depending on the appliance you are wearing.
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks. Avoid snacks and drinks containing sugars, and fizzy drinks. Also, sticky and hard foods may damage your brace.
  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and at least one other time during the day. Use a mouthwash if you need to. Your dental team may recommend a stronger fluoride toothpaste, or perhaps a fluoride gel or mouth rinse, for you to use.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/orthodontic-treatment

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The Advances of Technology in Orthodontics

The Advances of Technology in Orthodontics

What Does it Mean for Your Treatment?

Orthodontic treatment has come a long way over the years, and modern technology has played a significant role in making it more efficient and effective than ever before. From clear aligners to remote monitoring apps, there are many gadgets and apps available that can help improve the patient experience and treatment outcomes. In this age of innovation, orthodontists have access to a wide range of tools and techniques that can accelerate tooth movement, reduce overall treatment time, and provide patients with a more comfortable and convenient treatment experience. In this context, let’s explore some of the most popular gadgets and apps used in orthodontic treatment today.

CBCT 3D Imaging

We are able to capture 3D images of the teeth, mouths and faces by means of our Vatech GreenCone beam CT scanner with a very small radiation dose. We can change the view in order to concentrate on certain areas of interest, according to what your treatment needs are. In order to plan the therapy, we usually use a complete dental scan of the mouth that is going to emit no more radiation per patient than commonly used 2D panoramic orthomastography xrays and Lateral cephalometric xrays.

Full mouth scans are also recommended for dental implant planning, wisdom teeth extractions, and other surgical cases. To provide some perspective, the amount of radiation that a patient is exposed to during a full mouth scan is equivalent to the background radiation you would experience on a transcontinental flight. For such a low dosage, we are able to gain a wealth of diagnostic information that may otherwise be completely missed or overlooked with regular 2D imaging. With our Green CBCT machine, we are able to provide a much more accurate diagnosis and carry out treatment much more precisely. We can’t treat what we can’t see, so with CBCT 3D imaging, we can get a clear picture of exactly what’s going on in the oral cavity!

With our Green CBCT machine, we are able to provide a much more accurate diagnosis and carry out treatment much more precisely. We can’t treat what we can’t see, so with CBCT 3D imaging, we can get a clear picture of exactly what’s going on in the oral cavity!

iTero® 3D Scanner

For those of you who have had molds taken of your teeth with goopy, putty-like impression material, you will truly appreciate the revolutionary iTero 3D scanner. With this Digital Intraoral Scanner, it’s using laser technology to take thousands of photographs of your teeth and stitches them into an incredibly accurate three-dimensional model that won’t disturb the patient in any way. This is a 3D scanner that we use for Invisalign Orthodontic Treatment Planning, Retainers, Nightguards, Crowns, Bridges, Dental Implants and Other Oral Devices. The whole arch scan can take approximately 60 seconds, so you won’t have to spend hours waiting for what seems like endless time before the goop comes on. A full arch scan takes just about 60 seconds, so you’ll no longer have to wait for what seems like forever for goop to set.

Formlabs 3D Printer

Using the digital scans we take with our iTero® 3D scanner, we are be able to 3D print models of your teeth and fabricate custom-made retainers and clear aligners all in-house!

CariVu Caries Detector

The CariVu is an amazing device that we use during your dental exam to visualize and verify the presence of carious lesions (cavities) and cracks in the teeth. We are able to identify caries which may not be detected or difficult to detect in a conventional xray, with the use of transilluminated tooth laser technology. CariVu uses no ionizing radiation, so it’s completely safe for children, pregnant women and patients who are Xray averse.It also allows us to evaluate the extent of decay, so if a cavity is actually smaller than it appears on an x-ray, we can elect to perform more conservative treatment.

DenRobo track

A smart device for monitoring and measuring patients’ teeth gap in process of orthodontics treatment.

  • This device can document all steps.
  • Through the fingerprint of each patient, the device can be adjusted and make a document for each patient aromatically.
  • This device is lightweight and easy to use.

Den Robo Track is a superior option when compared to 3D scanners due to its numerous advantages. Firstly, DenRobo Track is significantly more affordable than 3D scanners, making it an attractive option for businesses looking to reduce costs while maintaining accuracy. Secondly, Den Robo Track boasts high accuracy, which is essential in industries where precision is crucial. Thirdly, DenRobo Track is incredibly easy to install and operate, reducing labor costs and downtime. Lastly, DenRobo Track saves time by using fingerprint technology to quickly identify and track objects, streamlining the workflow and increasing productivity. Overall, DenRobo Track offers a compelling alternative to 3D scanners with its low cost, high accuracy, ease of installation, and time-saving features.

Artificial Intelligence in Orthodontic Smart Application for Treatment

The usage of the portable electronic devices such as the smartphones and handheld
tablets have increased over the years, and this is true in the health-care industry also. This
is because of the development of various patient management software. The use of
apps to manage, educate, and inform patient is not uncommon among orthodontists
nowadays.

Mobile Applications in Orthodontics

Mobile applications (apps) are to be a crucial tool in management of modern aesthetic and comfortable treatments where patient compliance is the key. They already play an increasingly important role in daily life and patients’ social networks like Instagram represent an aid to the standard verbal motivation performed by orthodontists towards young patients under an orthodontic treatment. With the number of orthodontic-related apps continuing to increase, and the rapid development of artificial intelligence, the potential to yield tremendous benefits to both clinicians and patients is apparent. More advanced features of artificial intelligence have been introduced to orthodontic applications recently. For example, three-dimensional convolutional neural networks (3D CNN) have high potential for automatized 3D cephalometric evaluation directly from the Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or facial growth predictions.

These advanced forms of artificial intelligence can overtake also the process of orthodontic auxiliaries designing where currently dominates Finite Element Analysis (FEM)

Seven studies (35%) were based on apps used for diagnostics, and all were cephalometric apps.  7 studies (41%) investigating apps used for reminders were present. 4 studies (24%) investigated dedicated remote monitoring apps and all four studied Dental Monitoring.

In comparison to app analyzed in this research paper (StrojCHECK®, Bratislava, Slovakia, 3Dent Medical, osim.sk (accessed on 1 November 2021)—Society for Medical Innovation (SMI)), most of the current apps used for orthodontic purposes, are simple apps without back-end or any Artificial Intelligence (AI) implementations. There is no publication about orthodontic apps other than simple reminders, basic diagnostics (cephalometry) or remote monitoring. Most of the app regarding orthodontic therapy are focused on oral hygiene status and coaching. Despite the current weak scientific coverage, there are no doubts tele-orthodontics is the future of dental digitalization.

In the current situation described above, I would point out that over 90% of all apps used in orthodontics are single applications which have no servers back up and possess truly intelligent behavior. Clinical effectiveness could be significantly increased with the use of algorithms based on Machine Learning and additional levels of artificial intelligence. The impact of updating a current orthodontic app with an artificial intelligence algorithm for decision making is described in this paper.

Technologies in our mobiles transformed almost every aspect of our lives. Smartphones enable patients to request, receive, and transmit information irrespective of the time and place. Also, the global pandemic has forced healthcare providers to employ TeleHealth technology to help handling this tense situation.

1.2. Tele-Orthodontics—Dental Monitoring

Tele-orthodontics—Dental Monitoring® (DM) (Dental Monitoring Co., Paris, France) with distant monitoring is current reality in orthodontics. We can, as the clinical orthodontists proactively monitor our patients with virtual examinations to supplement chairside appointments. Though this approach is tainted with negative connotations associated with the direct to patient business model 9], there are undisputable advantages of remote monitoring to the clinical practice of orthodontics

Dental Monitoring is reducing (not eliminating) the need for in-office visits. However, nearly half of the studies currently published on this topic comparing clinical treatment with DM and without DM, frequently misunderstand the focus of this technology. The spotlight of this AI-powered DM is not on reduction of patient’s visits rather enhanced level of control over treatment development. As described earlier in this paper, the CAT in general, is prone to patients’ indiscipline. Patient not wearing aligners properly (more than 22 h per day), results in situation called “non-tracking”. This manifests as a discrepancy between shape of the aligner and real teeth position. This can be evaluated with DM. Possible lower frequency of physical visits to dental clinic is only secondary. However, it is beneficial for both the orthodontist and the patient, as the orthodontist can improve treatment and chairside efficiency, while the patients can avoid the extra financial and time costs of traveling to the practice. The key point remains that DM setup protocol allows better control over the treatment despite they might result even in more frequent patient visits as every lost attachment is noticed and the alarms are triggered. In contrary the frequency of non-DM-patient checkups are defined by the orthodontist and loss of attachment might be overlooked and despite longer time between in-office visits of such a patient, the treatment with CAT with missing attachments will probably result in aligner non-

A typical implementation of TeleHealth systems like Dental Monitoring® (Dental Monitoring Co., Paris, France) require initial patient education. The patients’ own mobile is used for the app and the scanning. First patient downloads the free Dental Monitoring app and activates the free DM app.  Then the first scan is performed with support of nurses in the clinic. All consecutive video scans are created by patient usually in a home environment. Patient is provided with scan-box that improves quality of video scans

Use of tele-orthodontics like DM can improve the monitoring of patients during the COVID-19 dissemination. It allowed us to monitor all patients during pandemic lockdowns, reduced the costs and limited direct contact when was not necessary. With all these means it has decreased the risk of COVID-19 dissemination.

In conclusion, the advances of technology in orthodontic treatment have revolutionized the way that dental professionals approach correcting misaligned teeth. From 3D imaging and computer-aided design to invisible aligners and orthodontic apps, the use of various gadgets and apps has made orthodontic treatment more efficient, precise, and comfortable for patients. These technological advancements have also improved communication between patients and their orthodontists, allowing for better collaboration and more personalized treatment plans. As technology continues to advance, the future of orthodontic treatment is certainly promising, with the potential for even more innovative tools and techniques on the horiz.